Posts in "children" tag

Child Literacy on the Rise

Tim Green Syracuse - Child Literacy on the Rise

As somebody who has dedicated a huge portion of his life to children reading and child literacy, I understand the importance of child literacy. The ability to read has always, and will always be, an incredibly important skill in adulthood. As the author of multiple children’s and young adults books, I have always pushed for child literacy. And that work is paying off.

 

According to a recent report from USA Today, child literacy is far better today than it was ten years ago. According to a test conducted over the course of 12 years at Ohio State University, students who are in kindergarten are learning now what they used to in first grade. This more robust, earlier learning has directly resulted in higher reading proficiency.

 

The study surveyed hundreds of thousands of students from thousands of schools in 44 states. After being tested in both basic and advanced literacy skills, the researchers realized that today’s children are challenged much earlier than before.

 

Professor of Teaching at Ohio University, Emily Rodgers noted the staggering difference in literacy rates, stating, “Children are better prepared when they enter first grade than they used to be. Kindergarten is the new first grade when it comes to learning reading skills.”

 

The test found low-performing children’s basic understanding increase in a variety of skills, ranging from letter identification to print awareness.

 

While this news is incredibly heartening to advocates for child literacy, unfortunately there is still much work that needs to be done. Jerome D’Agostino, a co-author of the study believes that there is a “missing link” between teaching low-performing students literacy skills and having them implement those skills in reading. Rodgers believes that we are focusing too heavily on the basic skills instead of offering “opportunities to actually read text.”
Regardless, I am incredibly happy to hear that child literacy rates, in any capacity, are improving. I am confident that, as we continue to study and adapt our literacy curriculums, we will one day achieve near universal literacy levels.

Tim Green Featured in Houston Chronicle

Tim Green - Tim Green Featured in Houston Chronicle

It comes as no surprise that Tim Green has had a storied and successful career. He’s gone from being an accomplished football player to a successful lawyer and best-selling author. In short, Tim Green is a renaissance man. And his talent and abilities have become recognized for years, all over the country. One of his more recent mentions was in the Houston Chronicle.

Just last month, the Houston Chronicle ran a story on Tim citing his many achievements. While they mentioned his past as a defensive end for the Atlanta Falcons, the article focused a bit more on Tim’s storytelling. The article primarily dealt with Tim’s latest book to release “Left Out”, which deals with a young deaf boy attempting to fit into a new school by playing football.

The article mentions how the book came about in the first place, citing Tim’s inspiration. While on tour for one of his books a few years ago, Tim came across a young boy in Arkansas who played football and had cochlear implants. He then met another similar boy from Kentucky who played football and had cochlear implants. This is what inspired Tim to give his character cochlear implants as well.

Inspired to base his book on these two boys, Tim said, “I was thinking about my next book and thought this would be a great story.” So Tim began to write, and in order to make the story as true to life as possible, he kept in constant contact with both boys, asking them about their experiences.

The article also mentioned Tim’s visit to Houston in order to talk to young students about the importance of reading. The speech is part of Inprint’s Cool Brains! reading series for young people.

The article also mentioned Green’s newest book, “Baseball Genius”, which is scheduled to release in March. The book was co-written by former baseball star Derek Jeter.

Tim Green Speaks at Illinois Reading Council

Tim Green Syracuse Speaks at Illinois Reading Council

Last month, Tim Green visited the Illinois Reading Council conference in an effort to continue his campaign for literacy. An already established author, Green has dedicated much of his time, visiting over 1,000 schools and speaking to more than 500,000 students, in order to demonstrate the power and importance of reading.

Held in Peoria, Illinois, the Illinois Reading Council conference is one of the largest literacy conferences in the country, lasting three days and featuring dozens of speakers and advocates for literacy.

Green had two panels during the conference, both focused on how reading is like weightlifting for your brain. With only 20 minutes of reading a day significantly boosting character development and academic performance, it is one of the best possible activities for not only children to practice, but adults as well.

The conference was attended by local Lostant Community School faculty members, Melissa Einhaus and Ruth Ann Bruzgis. Of all of the speakers at the conference, Einhaus was particularly interested in Green, noting his influence on children’s drive to read.

In a recent article from the Tonica News, Einhaus stated, “he’s responsible for getting a lot of boys to read. Kids that are into sports, he can really hook them into reading.”

Both Einhaus and Bruzgis admired Green’s star power. “We were kind of star-struck,” Einhaus said. “We went by his room and we were like, ‘Is that who I think it is?’”

Other notable speakers at the conference include award-winning author Steven Layne, Newbery Honor author Joan Bauer and Project CRISS director Dr. Debra Franciosi.

According to DoSomething.org, ⅔ of students who cannot read proficiently by the 4th grade are likely to end up in jail or on welfare, and students who cannot read by the 3rd grade are four times more likely to drop out of school. This is why conferences such as the IRC are integral to raise awareness of the importance of reading to a child. You can expect Tim Green to attend similar events, and continue to do his part in making literacy amongst children a number one priority.