Posts in "Reading" tag

3 Great Children’s Books for the Summer

Tim Green-3 Great Children’s Books for the Summer

It’s the dead of summer and you know what that means: kids don’t have to be in school for about 3 months. What does the average child do over the course of a traditional summer? Usually, he or she watches television, plays video games or plays outside with friends and family. While those are all perfectly fine things to do, the former two activities tend to have something of a detrimental effect on children’s minds if not done in moderation. They can cause children to forget most of what they’ve learned during the school year. They need an activity that will keep them occupied and happy, while also bolstering their education. With that being said, I’ve decided to compile a shortlist of books that any child should read over the long summer break.

 

Cosmic Cosmonauts

I understand that most children aren’t overly eager to read a book over the summer, however, Cosmic Cosmonauts should definitely take some of the “boredom” out of reading. It is a graphic novel centered on the adventures of two boys, Jeremy and Justin, who accidentally bring their favorite video game to life. The twin brothers must overcome their different personalities to beat the real-life video game. With a hilarious and heartwarming story and fantastic illustrations all done by Christopher Eliopoulos, this graphic novel is sure to entice young readers.

 

Babymouse: Lights, Camera, Middle School

Jennifer L. Holm and Matthew Holm are at it again with another entry in their tried-and-true Babymouse series, Babymouse: Lights, Camera, Middle School. In order to fit into her new and difficult middle school, Babymouse joins the film club in order to create a movie about her experiences. Another graphic novel jam-packed with gorgeous illustrations, weird and whacky characters and a hilarious story that should entertain youngsters all summer long.

 

National Geographic Kids Almanac

This might sound like an incredibly strange way to end the list, but the National Geographic Kids Almanacs (NGKA) are some of the best reading material for children, period. What makes them so perfect is the fact that they are educational, which is definitely what kids need during the long summer break. And while you’re probably thinking to yourself, “It’s hard enough to get children to read something at all, let alone something that’s educational.” That’s the best part of the NGKA! They are full of fascinating information and facts as well as vibrantly colored pages, visually entertaining illustrations and some of the most gorgeous, high-resolution images that are all designed to engage and hook children. The almanacs cover a wide range of topics, from animals to astronomy to food. While you should probably purchase the most recent 2017 edition, it couldn’t hurt to purchase the previous editions — chances are, your child will enjoy them so much they’ll be begging for all of them!

Getting Your Child to Read this Summer

Tim Green Getting Your Child to Read this Summer

June is officially here and that means that summer is just around the corner. And what does summertime mean to most? Warm weather, suntans, relaxing by the pool and no school! Schoolchildren get a nice three month break from school to bask in the warm rays of the sun. Unfortunately, this lack of school work is the perfect chance for children to forget everything they learned. In order for your child to retain their knowledge and education, it is best if they continue to read throughout the summer. However, that is easier said than done considering that most children would rather play outside with friends than sit inside and read a book.

 

So how can you get your child to enjoy reading during their summer break? Hopefully, these tips should get your child reading for the rest of the summer.

 

E-books

Technology is all around us and it is taking over our lives. Today’s children are growing up in a world where physical paper is no longer a necessity. So electronic methods of reading books are a viable option. If your child shows resistance to reading a traditional paperback or hardcover novel, then why not appeal to their digital generation and get them reading on an e-reader? As long as your child is reading and learning during the summer, the medium they choose to acquire that knowledge is not important.

 

Consider other forms of reading

Getting your child to read a classic novel like The Grapes of Wrath or The Great Gatsby can prove to be difficult, especially during the summer; that is why looking into other forms of reading can prove beneficial. Comic books and graphic novels can stimulate your child’s brain and contain colorful images that are sure to entertain and engage. And for those that believe that comic books can not provide any educational substance, there are comic books that are specifically designed to be educational.

 

Visit a bookstore or library

While your child may have a clear schedule for the rest of the summer, you most likely still have to work. However, whenever you get the chance, make sure to take your child to a bookstore or library. By surrounding your child with books, they can only become more interested in reading. And it also helps if your child sees you reading as well. Set a good example and your child will follow suit.

 

Hopefully, some of these methods will work for you and get your children reading as many books as they can! Keep on reading and have a great summer!

Child Literacy on the Rise

Tim Green Syracuse - Child Literacy on the Rise

As somebody who has dedicated a huge portion of his life to children reading and child literacy, I understand the importance of child literacy. The ability to read has always, and will always be, an incredibly important skill in adulthood. As the author of multiple children’s and young adults books, I have always pushed for child literacy. And that work is paying off.

 

According to a recent report from USA Today, child literacy is far better today than it was ten years ago. According to a test conducted over the course of 12 years at Ohio State University, students who are in kindergarten are learning now what they used to in first grade. This more robust, earlier learning has directly resulted in higher reading proficiency.

 

The study surveyed hundreds of thousands of students from thousands of schools in 44 states. After being tested in both basic and advanced literacy skills, the researchers realized that today’s children are challenged much earlier than before.

 

Professor of Teaching at Ohio University, Emily Rodgers noted the staggering difference in literacy rates, stating, “Children are better prepared when they enter first grade than they used to be. Kindergarten is the new first grade when it comes to learning reading skills.”

 

The test found low-performing children’s basic understanding increase in a variety of skills, ranging from letter identification to print awareness.

 

While this news is incredibly heartening to advocates for child literacy, unfortunately there is still much work that needs to be done. Jerome D’Agostino, a co-author of the study believes that there is a “missing link” between teaching low-performing students literacy skills and having them implement those skills in reading. Rodgers believes that we are focusing too heavily on the basic skills instead of offering “opportunities to actually read text.”
Regardless, I am incredibly happy to hear that child literacy rates, in any capacity, are improving. I am confident that, as we continue to study and adapt our literacy curriculums, we will one day achieve near universal literacy levels.

Tim Green To Sign Copies of New Book, “Baseball Genius”

Tim Green - Glowing Baseball Genius Review

Tim Green has recently released his new book Baseball Genius. The book, which was co-written with baseball legend, Derek Jeter, is sure to delight baseball fans both young and old. In order to promote the release, Tim will be signing copies of the book at Anderson’s Bookshop in Naperville, IL. The signing will begin at 7pm on Thursday, March 9th. In order to secure your spot in line, make sure to purchase your copy of the book at Anderson’s.

The book, which released on March 7th, tells the incredible story of Jalen DeLuca, a boy who can guess the type of throw that a pitcher will cast. He uses this amazing ability to aid the at-risk career of New York Yankee, James Yager, after he is caught attempting to steal baseballs from Yager’s home. The book draws some inspiration from Jeter’s life, as the main character’s name is derived from Jeter’s real-life nephew. The book is the first entry in a planned trilogy of baseball themed books from the two authors.

Jeter, who has had one of the greatest professional careers of any baseball player in league history, has published multiple books through his publishing company, Jeter Publishing. To date, Jeter Publishing has published 7 books—6 non-fiction adult books and 1 children’s story—with another children’s book slated to release next month. And Green is no stranger to the world of young adult reading himself, having published almost 20 books for children, with another 16 books for adults. Together, the two combined their respective experience and knowledge of baseball with their real life experiences into what is sure to be a home run.

The co-authors even appeared together on CBS’ This Morning in order to discuss the novel and some of its background.

If you’re interested in purchasing a copy of the novel from Anderson’s, visit Andersonsbookshop.com or call at (630) 355-2665.

Tim Green And Derek Jeter Co-Author Baseball Genius, Available March 7

Tim Green - Glowing Baseball Genius Review

What do you get when two amazing athletes team up to write a children’s novel? You get Baseball Genius. Tim Green and Derek Jeter have teamed up to create the incredible tale of a boy looking to join a baseball travel team. The story is sure to delight both new and old fans of Tim and Derek’s work. Below is the original press release for the novel:

 

March 7, 2017—Timothy J. Green, an author, former NFL defensive end, former Fox Sports broadcaster, and attorney with Barclay Damon, LLP, has co-authored the young-adult novel Baseball Genius with baseball legend Derek Jeter. The first in a trilogy of baseball novels to be co-authored by the pair, Baseball Genius will be released March 7.

Tim and Derek will discuss the book and their writing collaboration on CBS This Morning, March 8, during the 8 a.m. hour.

Baseball Genius is the story of Jalen DeLuca, a boy who loves baseball and wants to join a travel team but can’t afford the fee. After a failed scheme to come up with the money at the expense of James “JY” Yager, the Yankees’ star second baseman who is facing a batting slump, the pair realize they can work together to use Jalen’s special talent as a “baseball genius” to help both players solve their problems.

In addition to being a New York Times bestselling author and a retired defensive end with the Atlanta Falcons, Tim is an attorney with Barclay Damon, where he has been integrally involved for the past 20 years in developing some of the largest clients of the firm, particularly in the areas of energy and intellectual property. Tim works with other senior leaders of the firm to identify, evaluate, develop, and maintain as clients some of highest performing companies in the United States in areas of particular strategic focus to the firm.

John P. Langan, Barclay Damon’s managing partner, said, “All of us at Barclay Damon are proud to have Tim on our team. He is an extraordinary person in many ways and a true force of nature—so talented in so many different endeavors. In addition to being uniquely impactful in the success of the firm, his work as a New York Times bestselling author has been so impressive. It’s a pleasure to see the good work Tim does to encourage young people across the country to embrace reading and to explain the many benefits that come from being consistent, lifelong readers.”

In his 1,500-plus visits to schools throughout the United States, where he has spoken to nearly half a million students, Tim says reading is “weightlifting for your brain,” an essential habit that increases school success and builds character. Since he began writing for kids in 2007, his young-reader series has sold over a million copies. Tim uses all of his speaking fees to buy books for kids, libraries, and schools that could not afford them otherwise. Tim has written 35 books to date. Click here for more on his career as an author.

Barclay Damon, LLP, listed as a “Top 250 Firm” by The National Law Journal, is a full-service law firm with offices throughout the major cities of New York State and in Toronto, Boston, Washington DC, and Newark. With 275 lawyers in 33 practice areas, Barclay Damon is the largest law firm in the Northeastern United States centered outside a major market. Barclay Damon provides comprehensive legal and business counsel to a diverse client base. For more information, visit barclaydamon.com.

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Tim Green Featured in Houston Chronicle

Tim Green - Tim Green Featured in Houston Chronicle

It comes as no surprise that Tim Green has had a storied and successful career. He’s gone from being an accomplished football player to a successful lawyer and best-selling author. In short, Tim Green is a renaissance man. And his talent and abilities have become recognized for years, all over the country. One of his more recent mentions was in the Houston Chronicle.

Just last month, the Houston Chronicle ran a story on Tim citing his many achievements. While they mentioned his past as a defensive end for the Atlanta Falcons, the article focused a bit more on Tim’s storytelling. The article primarily dealt with Tim’s latest book to release “Left Out”, which deals with a young deaf boy attempting to fit into a new school by playing football.

The article mentions how the book came about in the first place, citing Tim’s inspiration. While on tour for one of his books a few years ago, Tim came across a young boy in Arkansas who played football and had cochlear implants. He then met another similar boy from Kentucky who played football and had cochlear implants. This is what inspired Tim to give his character cochlear implants as well.

Inspired to base his book on these two boys, Tim said, “I was thinking about my next book and thought this would be a great story.” So Tim began to write, and in order to make the story as true to life as possible, he kept in constant contact with both boys, asking them about their experiences.

The article also mentioned Tim’s visit to Houston in order to talk to young students about the importance of reading. The speech is part of Inprint’s Cool Brains! reading series for young people.

The article also mentioned Green’s newest book, “Baseball Genius”, which is scheduled to release in March. The book was co-written by former baseball star Derek Jeter.

Tim Green for Play 60/Read 20 with the Bears, Cowboys, and the Patriots

Over the past several months, football season has kicked back into gear and with football season comes the kicking into gear of Play 60/Read 20. For those unfamiliar, Play 60/Read 20 is initiative started in partnership with the NFL. We already know that getting 60 minutes of physical activity is essential for the healthy development of children, but reading just 20 minutes a day is essential to building some strong brain muscles. It’s basically a workout for the brain!

Now that Play 60/Read 20 is back into full gear, Tim Green has been spending a lot of time outside of Syracuse and visiting schools across the nation. Where possible, Tim has been partnering up with local NFL players to speak about Play 60/Read 20, read excerpts from his most recent book Left Out, and participate in 60 minutes of outdoor exercise.

At Kilmer School in West Roxbury, Tim Green partnered up with Patriots David Andrews and Geneo Grissom. “It’s fun for me” said Grissom, “to spend time with some kids who probably wouldn’t be able to have this opportunity any other way.”

In Frisco, Texas, Tim Green teamed up with Dallas Cowboys cornerback Brandon Carr. The event took place near the Frisco Public Library. “Showing that it’s actually cool to read books,” Carr Said, “and care about your education and future is how I hope to use my platform in a positive way.” This was the second time the Carr and Green had partnered up.

Tim Green also made an appearance at a Central Arkansas school. This held some particular significance as the inspiration for the leading character in Left Out is based off of a student named Brett Bell, whom Green met in Arkansas a couple of years ago. The book also pays homage to another student, Megan Nickell, a Central Arkansas Christian student who passed away in 2015.

In all of Tim’s visits, one message has stayed the same—the importance of literature, how it can reach into our lives and change us for the better, and how everywhere we go, we must treat people with an open heart.

For a full review of Tim Green in the news, check out Tim’s Press Page.

Five Tips to Get Your Kids Reading

Tim Green Syracuse - Five Tips to Get Your Kids Reading

We know that 60 minutes of physical activity is good for kids. Now it’s time to encourage 20 minutes of reading, as well. That’s the back bone of the NFL’s Play 60/Read 20 initiative that Tim Green played a role in kicking off (pun intended).  Reading should be fun and it should be frequent. If your kid is having trouble getting into a book, Tim Green recommends that you check out these 5 tips to get them reading.

Tips originally posted in HarperCollins Children Blog.

Tim Green Reading In Port Clinton

Tim Green is excited to announce that he will be paying the town of Port Clinton a visit for a reading of some of his most recent work. A huge thanks goes out to the Friends of Ida Rupp Public Library and the Ida Rupp Public Library itself for inviting Tim Green down.

The reading will be taking place at the Port Clinton Performing Arts Center Monday, September 12 @ 6:30pm. To guarantee a seat, visit the Ida Rupp Public Library website at idarupp.org or give the library at call at 419-732-3212. If you’re unable to register, still feel free to show up! There very well may still be some space. After the reading, Tim Green will be fielding questions about his books, career, and life.

Tim Green is a huge advocate of reading. Even as a first-round NFL draft pick with over an eight-career in professional sports, Green advocates school before sports to his own kids. That’s not to say kids should be skipping out on sports. By all means, an active lifestyle is ideal for everyone and the earlier the start the better. Yet at the same time, we can’t overlook the benefits of reading.

Studies show that children who read 20 minutes a day not only develop more empathetic skill sets, they also perform better in every academic subject. So the ideal arrangement is a mix between getting a physical workout and getting mental workout. That’s why Tim Green helped establish the Play 60/Read 20 campaign with the NFL.

Reading is not only healthy, it’s fun and that’s something that Tim Green tries to convey in all of his books. This all sounds great, but how do you actually get your kids to be excited about reading? This is something that Tim Green has thought about a lot.

Check out Tim Green’s 5 Tips on Getting Your Kids to Read.

17 Reasons Why Reading is Important for Children and Adults

17 Reasons Why Reading is Important for Children and Adults by Tim Green

 

Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers. – Charles W. Elio

Reading is a crucial element of every child’s education, yet when our children begin struggling with the subject, many parents and kid’s alike get frustrated and give up. All too easily they accept that they’re just not that interested in reading or worse, “don’t see the point.”

This can be especially common when the parent themselves never formed a strong bond to reading when they were growing up. But reading skills, and moreover, a love for reading, have so many benefits to minds of all ages.

Before you decide that reading just isn’t your child’s strong suit (or maybe your own!), consider the following benefits of reading, both now and in the future.

Benefits during childhood

Reading develops and expands language skills. Even before a child is ready to read on their own, children begin developing critical language and enunciation skills by listening to others speak and read. Time spent reading to your child helps them by reinforcing the basic sounds that form language. As that child grows up and begin reading on their own, the more they read the more words they will gain exposure to. This enhances not only their comprehension of reading, but their everyday vocabulary making them more article and well-spoken. Reading books is also vital for learning new languages which allow non-native speakers gain exposure to words used in context.

Reading exercises your brain. Reading to the brain is what physical activity is to the body: it’s exercise! The more you exercise your brain, the better it gets at completing the task. Seems common sense, but many find it difficult to push through the initial phases of learning where they are still struggling with basic comprehension. The good news is: practice really does make perfect, at least when it comes to reading. The more a child reads, the better they will get at it. And no, TV, not even the best educational shows, are as good at exercising for your brain as reading.

Reading improves concentration. When children regularly practice sitting still and focusing on a story, they develop the ability to do this for longer periods.

Reading improves memory. Many don’t realize that when they are reading a book, they are actually practicing using their memory a lot. To understand the story, you have to be able to remember an assortment of character names, their backgrounds, motivations, history, and personality traits, as well as the various arcs and sub-plots that weave together the larger story.

Reading improves analytical thinking skills. If you’ve ever read a book and found yourself predicting what could happen or who could have been responsible for some mystery, you’ve experienced how reading can challenge your critical thinking skills. Not to mention the analytical skills you need in order to critique the plot, writing, character development, and storyline.

Reading exposes us to different parts of the world. Through reading, children are able to learn about people, places, and events outside their own set of personal experiences. They are exposed to ways of life, ideas, and beliefs about the world which may be different from or even challenge those around them. Reading opens the door for discovering new passions and interests and further educating themselves in anything they are interested in.

Reading improves your imagination. When we read, our brains translate words into pictures. We’re imaging not only how scenes look, but how the characters feel. We connect these images to our own experiences and ask ourselves how we would feel in a similar situation.

Reading develops empathy. When we use our imaginations to understand how characters are feeling, we are also engaging with our sense of empathy. As with reading, the more we practice empathy, the better we get at being able to identify with and feel with others.

Reading makes kids do better at all aspects of school. The benefits of reading aren’t limited to subjects like English and history. Children who read tend to do better at all subjects, and they do better all the way through school. Numerous studies have shown that students who are exposed to reading before preschool are more likely to do well in all facets of formal education. Think about it, if a student struggles to put together words and sentences, how can he/she be expected to grasp other subjects written out and explained in texts books as they discover new subjects?

Reading is fundamental in developing a good self image. Nonreaders or poor readers often have lower opinions of themselves and their abilities than their literate classmate counterparts. This can be isolating, discourage kids from learning altogether, and consequently, behavioral problems can surface.

Reading is a fun form of entertainment. Aside from the benefits to performance, reading itself is really fun. Immersing yourself in a story, feeling suspense as the storyline unfolds, and getting emotionally attached to the characters you watch develop are all parts of reading that keep avid readers come back for more.

Benefits in adulthood

Reading is fundamental to functioning in modern society. Many adults today lack crucial literacy skills. This can prevent them from properly performing a number of important, everyday tasks that are expected of adults, including: reading/understanding instructions on a medicine bottle, acquiring/filling out applications, reading warning signs on the road, or even following directions on a map. Day-to-day activities that many people take for granted become a source of frustration, shame, and fear.

Reading is vital to finding a good job. Most of today’s well-paying jobs require reading as a basic skill to properly perform the functions of the job. Instructions, reports, and memos all need to be read, understood, and properly applied. Poor reading skills can slow or even halt your professional development.

Readers enjoy art and do good things in the world. A study by the NEA found that people who read for pleasure are many times more likely than those who do not to visit museums and attend concerts, and almost three times as likely to perform volunteer and charity work. Readers are more active participants in the world around them, and do more for the well-being of others.

Reading makes you more interesting. With all the knowledge that readers acquire from books, they tend to have more subjects they can participate in during conversations, both casual and academic. This also allows you to engage with a wider variety of people and conversations, which in turn improve your knowledge and conversation skills.

Reading reduces stress. Many studies have shown that reading reduces your stress levels. In fact, in one study done by consultancy firm Mindlab International at the University of Sussex, they found that subjects only needed to read silently for as little as six minutes to begin experiencing a slower heart rate and less tension in the muscles.

Reading builds new brain connections and strengthens existing ones. Studies have shown that staying mentally stimulated through reading and similar mentally challenging activities can slow the progress of (or possibly prevent) cognitive diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Dementia.

Final Thoughts

Reading is a crucial skill that better prepares you for professional success and personal happiness. Never be afraid to reach out for additional help if you or your child are struggling with literacy skills. The extra steps you take to improve them will create a lifetime of greater opportunities.

 

 

 

 

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