Posts in "tim green syracuse" tag

Getting Your Child to Read this Summer

Tim Green Getting Your Child to Read this Summer

June is officially here and that means that summer is just around the corner. And what does summertime mean to most? Warm weather, suntans, relaxing by the pool and no school! Schoolchildren get a nice three month break from school to bask in the warm rays of the sun. Unfortunately, this lack of school work is the perfect chance for children to forget everything they learned. In order for your child to retain their knowledge and education, it is best if they continue to read throughout the summer. However, that is easier said than done considering that most children would rather play outside with friends than sit inside and read a book.

 

So how can you get your child to enjoy reading during their summer break? Hopefully, these tips should get your child reading for the rest of the summer.

 

E-books

Technology is all around us and it is taking over our lives. Today’s children are growing up in a world where physical paper is no longer a necessity. So electronic methods of reading books are a viable option. If your child shows resistance to reading a traditional paperback or hardcover novel, then why not appeal to their digital generation and get them reading on an e-reader? As long as your child is reading and learning during the summer, the medium they choose to acquire that knowledge is not important.

 

Consider other forms of reading

Getting your child to read a classic novel like The Grapes of Wrath or The Great Gatsby can prove to be difficult, especially during the summer; that is why looking into other forms of reading can prove beneficial. Comic books and graphic novels can stimulate your child’s brain and contain colorful images that are sure to entertain and engage. And for those that believe that comic books can not provide any educational substance, there are comic books that are specifically designed to be educational.

 

Visit a bookstore or library

While your child may have a clear schedule for the rest of the summer, you most likely still have to work. However, whenever you get the chance, make sure to take your child to a bookstore or library. By surrounding your child with books, they can only become more interested in reading. And it also helps if your child sees you reading as well. Set a good example and your child will follow suit.

 

Hopefully, some of these methods will work for you and get your children reading as many books as they can! Keep on reading and have a great summer!

Educational Technology for Kids

Tim Green - Educational Technology for Kids

It’s no secret that we are living in a digital age. Technology is advancing at such an alarming rate that a Jetsons-style society is no longer so unfeasible. And while some believe that technology does more harm than good, it is impossible to discredit all the good that tech has done for us as a species. Business, infrastructure and philanthropy are only a small fraction of the industries that have been impacted by technology. One aspect of our society that has benefited the most from advanced tech is education. As a huge proponent of education, I’m thrilled with the new technological breakthroughs that are allowing us to do more with the way we teach our kids. Here are a few of the most exciting developments being made in the classroom.

One of the most touching stories regarding technology’s implementation with education has to be that of Peyton Walton, a young girl from Maryland who was diagnosed with cancer. Because of her radiation therapy, she cannot leave her hospital bed. Because of this, Peyton missed the atmosphere of being in a classroom and learning new things with her friends. Fortunately, through the power of technology, Peyton was able to virtually attend class. Nicknamed PAVS (Peyton’s Awesome Virtual Self), the robot is essentially an iPad firmly connected to a rolling robot of sorts. Through the use of the robot, Peyton is able to view the class’ daily activities, using the iPad as a two-way video communicator. And because the iPad is connected to a movable robot, Peyton can “move” around the class, allowing her to move about with her friends and speak to teachers. It’s not only fascinating technology, it is a heartwarming example of how much of an impact technology can have on our society. Allowing a young girl, who would otherwise feel alienated from her classmates, to feel included is an amazing accomplishment; and it’s all in the name of education!

Another fascinating use of technology in a classroom is virtual reality (VR). Virtual reality is pretty self-explanatory. Essentially, children wear goggles that are fed a virtual image from a computer. These images then surround the children, simulating a real world experience. It is truly remarkable. This technology has been around for quite some time, but it has only gotten better since its creation. According to an article from ARVRMagazine.com, when children use the technology, engagement is unparalleled. It completely entices them and captures their attention, making them want to learn as much as they can from the program. 

Technology is no longer an option; it has invaded every part of our daily lives. And it has been an incredible boon in many industries, particularly education. I’m excited to see what the future holds.

Child Literacy on the Rise

Tim Green Syracuse - Child Literacy on the Rise

As somebody who has dedicated a huge portion of his life to children reading and child literacy, I understand the importance of child literacy. The ability to read has always, and will always be, an incredibly important skill in adulthood. As the author of multiple children’s and young adults books, I have always pushed for child literacy. And that work is paying off.

 

According to a recent report from USA Today, child literacy is far better today than it was ten years ago. According to a test conducted over the course of 12 years at Ohio State University, students who are in kindergarten are learning now what they used to in first grade. This more robust, earlier learning has directly resulted in higher reading proficiency.

 

The study surveyed hundreds of thousands of students from thousands of schools in 44 states. After being tested in both basic and advanced literacy skills, the researchers realized that today’s children are challenged much earlier than before.

 

Professor of Teaching at Ohio University, Emily Rodgers noted the staggering difference in literacy rates, stating, “Children are better prepared when they enter first grade than they used to be. Kindergarten is the new first grade when it comes to learning reading skills.”

 

The test found low-performing children’s basic understanding increase in a variety of skills, ranging from letter identification to print awareness.

 

While this news is incredibly heartening to advocates for child literacy, unfortunately there is still much work that needs to be done. Jerome D’Agostino, a co-author of the study believes that there is a “missing link” between teaching low-performing students literacy skills and having them implement those skills in reading. Rodgers believes that we are focusing too heavily on the basic skills instead of offering “opportunities to actually read text.”
Regardless, I am incredibly happy to hear that child literacy rates, in any capacity, are improving. I am confident that, as we continue to study and adapt our literacy curriculums, we will one day achieve near universal literacy levels.

Tim Green Featured in Houston Chronicle

Tim Green - Tim Green Featured in Houston Chronicle

It comes as no surprise that Tim Green has had a storied and successful career. He’s gone from being an accomplished football player to a successful lawyer and best-selling author. In short, Tim Green is a renaissance man. And his talent and abilities have become recognized for years, all over the country. One of his more recent mentions was in the Houston Chronicle.

Just last month, the Houston Chronicle ran a story on Tim citing his many achievements. While they mentioned his past as a defensive end for the Atlanta Falcons, the article focused a bit more on Tim’s storytelling. The article primarily dealt with Tim’s latest book to release “Left Out”, which deals with a young deaf boy attempting to fit into a new school by playing football.

The article mentions how the book came about in the first place, citing Tim’s inspiration. While on tour for one of his books a few years ago, Tim came across a young boy in Arkansas who played football and had cochlear implants. He then met another similar boy from Kentucky who played football and had cochlear implants. This is what inspired Tim to give his character cochlear implants as well.

Inspired to base his book on these two boys, Tim said, “I was thinking about my next book and thought this would be a great story.” So Tim began to write, and in order to make the story as true to life as possible, he kept in constant contact with both boys, asking them about their experiences.

The article also mentioned Tim’s visit to Houston in order to talk to young students about the importance of reading. The speech is part of Inprint’s Cool Brains! reading series for young people.

The article also mentioned Green’s newest book, “Baseball Genius”, which is scheduled to release in March. The book was co-written by former baseball star Derek Jeter.

Tim Green and Atlanta Falcons Team Up For Play 60/ Read 20

Tim Green - Tim Green and Atlanta Falcons Team Up For Play 60 Read 20

Recently, Tim Green visited Lake Windward Elementary School in Alpharetta, Georgia in his ongoing effort to get children to read and get active. Tim, joined by Atlanta Falcons’ Taylor Gabriel and Ben Garland, sat down with the elementary students and encouraged the children to read and play.

Tim does not only advocate reading and being active, he also makes it a point to teach the children about having good character. This is one of the themes discussed in his newest book, “Left Out,” which deals with a deaf boy playing on his new school’s football team in order to fit in. Tim also took a moment to read an excerpt of the book, as well as give out a free copy to each student.

The Play 60 campaign is nothing new to the NFL’s attempt at fighting childhood obesity. Tim, however, has added the Read 20 portion of the campaign, noting that, while physical activity is important, mental activity is just as necessary. Tim strongly encourages children to read at least 20 minutes a day. He believes that reading is like, “weightlifting for the brain.”  

Here is Tim’s official statement regarding the campaign:

“The wonderful thing about both reading and playing is that they’re fun. Unlike weight lifting to become a better athlete, weightlifting for the brain should be as pleasant as playing for 60 minutes on the playground. That’s a big part of my message to kids, and I suggest it should be yours.”

Tim Green Speaks at Illinois Reading Council

Tim Green Syracuse Speaks at Illinois Reading Council

Last month, Tim Green visited the Illinois Reading Council conference in an effort to continue his campaign for literacy. An already established author, Green has dedicated much of his time, visiting over 1,000 schools and speaking to more than 500,000 students, in order to demonstrate the power and importance of reading.

Held in Peoria, Illinois, the Illinois Reading Council conference is one of the largest literacy conferences in the country, lasting three days and featuring dozens of speakers and advocates for literacy.

Green had two panels during the conference, both focused on how reading is like weightlifting for your brain. With only 20 minutes of reading a day significantly boosting character development and academic performance, it is one of the best possible activities for not only children to practice, but adults as well.

The conference was attended by local Lostant Community School faculty members, Melissa Einhaus and Ruth Ann Bruzgis. Of all of the speakers at the conference, Einhaus was particularly interested in Green, noting his influence on children’s drive to read.

In a recent article from the Tonica News, Einhaus stated, “he’s responsible for getting a lot of boys to read. Kids that are into sports, he can really hook them into reading.”

Both Einhaus and Bruzgis admired Green’s star power. “We were kind of star-struck,” Einhaus said. “We went by his room and we were like, ‘Is that who I think it is?’”

Other notable speakers at the conference include award-winning author Steven Layne, Newbery Honor author Joan Bauer and Project CRISS director Dr. Debra Franciosi.

According to DoSomething.org, ⅔ of students who cannot read proficiently by the 4th grade are likely to end up in jail or on welfare, and students who cannot read by the 3rd grade are four times more likely to drop out of school. This is why conferences such as the IRC are integral to raise awareness of the importance of reading to a child. You can expect Tim Green to attend similar events, and continue to do his part in making literacy amongst children a number one priority.

Tim Green for Play 60/Read 20 with the Bears, Cowboys, and the Patriots

Over the past several months, football season has kicked back into gear and with football season comes the kicking into gear of Play 60/Read 20. For those unfamiliar, Play 60/Read 20 is initiative started in partnership with the NFL. We already know that getting 60 minutes of physical activity is essential for the healthy development of children, but reading just 20 minutes a day is essential to building some strong brain muscles. It’s basically a workout for the brain!

Now that Play 60/Read 20 is back into full gear, Tim Green has been spending a lot of time outside of Syracuse and visiting schools across the nation. Where possible, Tim has been partnering up with local NFL players to speak about Play 60/Read 20, read excerpts from his most recent book Left Out, and participate in 60 minutes of outdoor exercise.

At Kilmer School in West Roxbury, Tim Green partnered up with Patriots David Andrews and Geneo Grissom. “It’s fun for me” said Grissom, “to spend time with some kids who probably wouldn’t be able to have this opportunity any other way.”

In Frisco, Texas, Tim Green teamed up with Dallas Cowboys cornerback Brandon Carr. The event took place near the Frisco Public Library. “Showing that it’s actually cool to read books,” Carr Said, “and care about your education and future is how I hope to use my platform in a positive way.” This was the second time the Carr and Green had partnered up.

Tim Green also made an appearance at a Central Arkansas school. This held some particular significance as the inspiration for the leading character in Left Out is based off of a student named Brett Bell, whom Green met in Arkansas a couple of years ago. The book also pays homage to another student, Megan Nickell, a Central Arkansas Christian student who passed away in 2015.

In all of Tim’s visits, one message has stayed the same—the importance of literature, how it can reach into our lives and change us for the better, and how everywhere we go, we must treat people with an open heart.

For a full review of Tim Green in the news, check out Tim’s Press Page.

Five Tips to Get Your Kids Reading

Tim Green Syracuse - Five Tips to Get Your Kids Reading

We know that 60 minutes of physical activity is good for kids. Now it’s time to encourage 20 minutes of reading, as well. That’s the back bone of the NFL’s Play 60/Read 20 initiative that Tim Green played a role in kicking off (pun intended).  Reading should be fun and it should be frequent. If your kid is having trouble getting into a book, Tim Green recommends that you check out these 5 tips to get them reading.

Tips originally posted in HarperCollins Children Blog.

Tim Green Reading In Port Clinton

Tim Green is excited to announce that he will be paying the town of Port Clinton a visit for a reading of some of his most recent work. A huge thanks goes out to the Friends of Ida Rupp Public Library and the Ida Rupp Public Library itself for inviting Tim Green down.

The reading will be taking place at the Port Clinton Performing Arts Center Monday, September 12 @ 6:30pm. To guarantee a seat, visit the Ida Rupp Public Library website at idarupp.org or give the library at call at 419-732-3212. If you’re unable to register, still feel free to show up! There very well may still be some space. After the reading, Tim Green will be fielding questions about his books, career, and life.

Tim Green is a huge advocate of reading. Even as a first-round NFL draft pick with over an eight-career in professional sports, Green advocates school before sports to his own kids. That’s not to say kids should be skipping out on sports. By all means, an active lifestyle is ideal for everyone and the earlier the start the better. Yet at the same time, we can’t overlook the benefits of reading.

Studies show that children who read 20 minutes a day not only develop more empathetic skill sets, they also perform better in every academic subject. So the ideal arrangement is a mix between getting a physical workout and getting mental workout. That’s why Tim Green helped establish the Play 60/Read 20 campaign with the NFL.

Reading is not only healthy, it’s fun and that’s something that Tim Green tries to convey in all of his books. This all sounds great, but how do you actually get your kids to be excited about reading? This is something that Tim Green has thought about a lot.

Check out Tim Green’s 5 Tips on Getting Your Kids to Read.